60 years old and Completely Blind, this case have some specific characteristics and risk factors, including, having severe COVID-19, receiving High flow oxygen support, non-invasive mechanical ventilation, high-dose and long-term corticosteroids treatment, and delirium occurring transiently during the recovery period with negative SARS-CoV-2 results and improved laboratory results and no other organic cause in it. Blindness and physical disability could have been the reasons for delayed recovery and limitations for the management of the condition. Patient was not able to believe even after was counseled or was told about time, place or person. These detailed manifestations with dynamic changes in disease and related treatments might provide some clues to clarify the mechanism of psychiatric complications of COVID-19 and further inform targeted interventions. Although there was transient delirium during the early phase of recovery, moderate levels of fatigue, anxiety, and PTSD persisting for more than 6 months after discharge. Long-term follow-up of chronic neuropsychiatric sequel of SARS-Cov-2 infection is as important as follow-ups on acute neuropsychiatric complications." />
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International Journal of Advanced Research in Medicine
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International Journal of Advanced Research in Medicine

2021, Vol. 3, Issue 2, Part C

Post COVID 19 Neuro-Psychiatric complication: persistent delirium: A Case Report


Author(s): Suraj Dhankikar and Akansha Arewar

Abstract: COVID19 usually presents as severe pneumonia. Though it is different for everybody and it can cause symptoms that last weeks or months after the infection have gone. This is sometimes called Post-COVID-19 syndrome or "long COVID". One of the effects seen was Delirium. There are descriptions of neurological symptoms that can occur in this disease state, but there are few studies on the persistence of delirium for longer time. This clinical case describes a patient with no history of mental illness who developed psychotic symptoms in the context of an acute delirium due to COVID 19 and was persistent for 6 months after recovery. People who had mild symptoms at first can still have long-term problems, leaving patients with life-threatening respiratory, cardiovascular and cerebral complications. Clinicians should consider COVID 19 Neuro-psychiatric complications in the differential diagnosis of any patient with psychiatric symptoms or even the patients who are disoriented, irritable or non-cooperative. Highlights: Patient being >60 years old and Completely Blind, this case have some specific characteristics and risk factors, including, having severe COVID-19, receiving High flow oxygen support, non-invasive mechanical ventilation, high-dose and long-term corticosteroids treatment, and delirium occurring transiently during the recovery period with negative SARS-CoV-2 results and improved laboratory results and no other organic cause in it. Blindness and physical disability could have been the reasons for delayed recovery and limitations for the management of the condition. Patient was not able to believe even after was counseled or was told about time, place or person. These detailed manifestations with dynamic changes in disease and related treatments might provide some clues to clarify the mechanism of psychiatric complications of COVID-19 and further inform targeted interventions. Although there was transient delirium during the early phase of recovery, moderate levels of fatigue, anxiety, and PTSD persisting for more than 6 months after discharge. Long-term follow-up of chronic neuropsychiatric sequel of SARS-Cov-2 infection is as important as follow-ups on acute neuropsychiatric complications.

DOI: 10.22271/27069567.2021.v3.i2c.227

Pages: 133-135 | Views: 52 | Downloads: 24

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How to cite this article:
Suraj Dhankikar, Akansha Arewar. Post COVID 19 Neuro-Psychiatric complication: persistent delirium: A Case Report. Int J Adv Res Med 2021;3(2):133-135. DOI: 10.22271/27069567.2021.v3.i2c.227
International Journal of Advanced Research in Medicine