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International Journal of Advanced Research in Medicine
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International Journal of Advanced Research in Medicine

2021, Vol. 3, Issue 1, Part I

Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB): Study of clinico-demographic profile, and comparison of microbiological diagnostic modalities with special emphasis on role of CBNAAT in detecting rifampicin resistance in fluid specimens


Author(s): Dr. Yadvendra Singh, Dr. Lalit Singh, Dr. Rajeev Tandon and Dr. Pradeep Nirala

Abstract: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the place of CBNAAT in the diagnosis of extra-pulmonary TB in fluid specimens, and also detecting drug resistance in comparison to the Gold Standard - MGIT Bactec Culture.
Material and Methods: In prospective observational study of 2 yrs. among 165 EPTB cases, we studied the clinical presentation, compared the results of microbiological diagnostic modalities (ZN smear, CBNAAT, MGIT Culture) and evaluated the drug resistance.
Statistics: Used Chi square test via software STATA 15 and calculated p value.
Results: The positivity rate of CBNAAT (31.30%) was higher than ZN smear (23.92%), which was in turn higher than MGIT culture (9.9%) and CBNAAT was able to detect Rifampicin resistance in 16.66% EPTB cases.
Conclusion: We concluded that, the role of CBNAAT in fluid specimens should not be undermined and should be preferred over the “Gold standard” MGIT culture.


DOI: 10.22271/27069567.2021.v3.i1i.194

Pages: 515-522 | Views: 81 | Downloads: 47

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How to cite this article:
Dr. Yadvendra Singh, Dr. Lalit Singh, Dr. Rajeev Tandon, Dr. Pradeep Nirala. Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB): Study of clinico-demographic profile, and comparison of microbiological diagnostic modalities with special emphasis on role of CBNAAT in detecting rifampicin resistance in fluid specimens. Int J Adv Res Med 2021;3(1):515-522. DOI: 10.22271/27069567.2021.v3.i1i.194
International Journal of Advanced Research in Medicine